New Scheduling Priorities for Asylum Seekers

While there are many unknowns about these new procedures, in short, the office will start scheduling cases “backwards.” This means that the last person to apply for affirmative asylum will be the first person to receive an interview. This is a vast shift from their previous “first-come first-serve” policy.

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Obtaining Asylum for an Unaccompanied Minor

One of the most daunting challenges for an immigration attorney is representing an unaccompanied child (“UAC”) in an affirmative asylum case. Although logically most would assume that obtaining a positive decision for a child would be one of the easiest tasks at the asylum office, as children are inarguably the most vulnerable in any population, anyone who has worked within the immigration system understands that the laws that govern are not always straight-forward.

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Analysis of the Supreme Court's Partial Reinstatement of the Travel Ban

Perhaps the most striking immediate effect of the Court granting cert of this case is that it partially reinstated parts of the original travel ban. Until a final decision is made next year, the Court is allowing a very narrow version of the ban to go into effect for foreign nationals who lack any "bona fide relationship with any person or entity in the United States." Although this partial reinstatement is undeniably disheartening, it’s also important to note that its effect is significantly limited and difficult to implement due to the lack of guidance from the judicial branch.

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Your Rights During an ICE Raid

A new wave of raids recently conducted by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (“ICE”) have left many in a state of anxiety over the future of their immigration status in the United States. Although undocumented individuals have always been at risk of deportation, under the previous administration only certain immigrants were deemed “priority enforcement” by ICE agents, which essentially meant that many undocumented workers could continue to work and live in the United States without much worry of immediate removal.

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